Board briefed on housing intensification

Earlier this month the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board received a public briefing from Christchurch City Council staff on rules regarding housing intensification. The purpose of this briefing was to provide an overview of the current planning rules regarding housing intensification as well as potential future changes coming from the Government, in response to community concerns regarding intensification.

Council staff had previously presented the same briefing to the Council’s Urban Development and Transport Committee, before embarking on a series of public briefings to Community Boards. In the case of our Board, a number of members of the public were in attendance and were able to ask questions of staff.

In a bid to improve access, our Board live-streams our public meetings so that those who cannot attend can follow along online, and/or view the recording afterwards. We do this on a best-efforts basis using our own technology at zero cost to the ratepayer – an approach that comes with some limitations. Embedded below is the video from the housing intensification briefing – as you will see this has been streamed using a single webcam with limited video quality. Staff giving the briefing can be heard very well, however some of the questions from the floor not so much – apologies for that.

Continue reading “Board briefed on housing intensification”

Simon quoted in St Albans News

In the news: My 12 February article explained the timeline and consultation processes relating to the Council’s work to manage traffic downstream of the Christchurch Northern Corridor (CNC). This has formed the basis for an article in the current issue of the St Albans News. See below for the article, or head to stalbans.gen.nz for the full digital edition.

Collaboration with council paying off for residents

Continue reading “Simon quoted in St Albans News”

Work is starting downstream of the CNC – how were the designs decided?

Update: I’ve been closely following the issues around the Christchurch Northern Corridor (CNC) for some time now. The motorway is due to open ‘mid 2020’, and work is getting underway in the St Albans, Edgeware, and Mairehau areas to to manage the expected downstream increase in traffic.  This article recaps the Christchurch City Council’s consultation and decision-making processes over the past two years.

DEMP consultation leaflet 1
The leaflet from the first of three rounds of consultation

The Downstream Effects Management Plan (DEMP) was commissioned by the Christchurch City Council Continue reading “Work is starting downstream of the CNC – how were the designs decided?”

The Main North Road bus priority project in Papanui: an overview

Analysis: In late 2017 the Christchurch City Council consulted the public on a proposal for roading changes in the Papanui area, with the objective of improving public transport reliability and travel times along Main North Road. This article gives an overview of the changes being made, the anticipated benefits, and the status of the project at the time of writing.

MNR bus lanes web'

I curate the Think Papanui community engagement initiative, and have reported on the progress of the bus priority project for several years now, observing a high level of public interest through that time. Continue reading “The Main North Road bus priority project in Papanui: an overview”

Harewood/Gardiners/Breens traffic signals get the green light from Council

Recap: The Christchurch City Council gave in-principle approval for traffic lights at a Harewood Road intersection on Thursday. Earlier in 2019 Council staff consulted on safety improvements for the Harewood/Gardiners/Breens intersection, seeking feedback on two options. The response from the community was clear, with 77% of 1,085 submissions preferring traffic lights to either the alternative left-in/left-out proposal, or the status quo. The community’s feedback and this week’s Council’s decision prioritises connectivity for the community, with an independent safety assessment finding lights to be less safe than both the alternative option and also the current configuration.

Harewood for email.jpg

As a resident in the wider area, I travel through this intersection on at least a weekly basis, and I also have a strong interest in both urban design and community engagement. I’ve been following the debate around this intersection since Cr Aaron Keown campaigned on a ‘this intersection needs lights’ platform in the 2016 local election. (My own submission to the Council was in favour of one-laning Harewood Road as an affordable initial step that would allow for lights later if still needed – at the time I wasn’t aware that the Council had in fact approved one-laning back in 2010, but that the decision had never been implemented.) Continue reading “Harewood/Gardiners/Breens traffic signals get the green light from Council”